Pvt. Joshua P. Arrington - Co. G

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Joshua P. Arrington was born about 1844 in Georgia. He was the son of Jane B. Arrington, and father unknown, but his father is believed to have died between 1844-1850. He was reared in Jefferson County, Georgia.

1850 US Federal Census
Name: Joshua P Arrington
Age: 6
Estimated birth year: abt 1844
Birth Place: Georgia
Gender: Male
District 48, Jefferson, Georgia
Family Number: 138
Household Members:
Name Age
Jane B Arrington 36
Frances A Arrington 12
Mary E Arrington 10
Joshua P Arrington 6
Caleb A Arrington 3

The year 1860 found Johsua and two siblings living in the John Avert household, in Jefferson County. It is unknown what became of his mother, or sister Mary, but they both may have died between 1850-1860.

1860 US Federal Census
Name: Joshua P Aringter
Age in 1860: 15
Birth Year: abt 1845
Birthplace: Georgia
Home in 1860: District 77, Jefferson, Georgia
Post Office: Louisville
Household Members:
Name Age
John W Avret 37
Frances A Avret 33
Francis A Avret 7
Lucy A B Avret 6
Elizabeth W Avret 4
James A Avret 1
Francis A Aringter 21
Joshua P Aringter 15
Caleb A Aringter 13

Joshua enlisted on October 1st, 1861 at about 16 years of age in the Battey Guards, 38th Georgia Regiment. He served faithfully from that date through some of the bloodiest battles of the war and was seldom sick, or away from his company.

General John B. Gordon reported the movements and actions of Gordon's Georgia Brigade (which included the 38th Ga.) in this report of the actions occurring May 10th, 1864:

The march to Spotsylvania Court-House was begun by my brigade, with Early's division, on the night of the 7th. On the morning of the 8th I was placed in command of this division, consisting of three brigades--Pegram's (Virginia), Johnston's (North Carolina), and Gordon's (Georgia)--and on the afternoon of the same day reached Spotsylvania Court-House. On the afternoon of the 10th I received orders to move my division rapidly from the left of our lines to the support of Rodes' division, now being heavily assaulted by the enemy. When my division reached this position the enemy had carried the portion of work held by Doles' brigade, Rodes' division, and had reached a point more than 100 yards in rear of the line. My leading brigade (Johnston's North Carolina) was immediately formed, by direction of Lieutenant-General Ewell, across the head of the enemy's column and ordered to charge. In the mean time Gordon's brigade was also formed and ordered forward. The enemy was driven back with considerable loss, and our lines re-established. The loss in these two brigades was light.

While General Gordon reported the "losses were light," they were not without cost. Young Private Joshua P. Arrington was killed in action during this assault in repelling the Yankee's from the Confederate earth works. He is buried at the Confederate Cemetery at Spotsylvania Court House.

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